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Non-Disclosure Clause

Severance Agreements And Non-Disclosure Clause: Can You Use What You Learned In Your Job To Consult Other Companies? Severance from employment whether due to your resignation at will or retirement often requires severance contract between you and your employer. This Contract usually embodies the compensation you get from your departure in an employment position. As in retirement, an employer may offer severance package to a retiree as compensation for his/her years of service to the company, along with being an exchange for the employee’s waiver of right to sue. Severance Agreement is a contract between the retiree and the employer specifying the terms of employment termination. This is also offered to employees who are being laid off. Usually, Severance Agreements have consideration, which could include something of value which the employee is not already entitled yet. Employers usually provide employee time to consider the Severance Agreement before signing the same. For retirees, the Older Workers Benefit Program requires that the employer provide the employees over the age of 40 with a 45-day consideration period and at least 7-day revocation period. This Agreement also often include a Waiver or General release stipulation that the employee cannot sue his or her former employer due to wrongful termination or attempt to seek other unemployment benefits. Non-Compete and Non-Disclosure Clause   Depending on the retiree’s previous position and particular profession, some companies include in their Severance Agreement a Non-Compete Clause. This Clause serves as a contract between the retiree and his/her employer which stipulates that the departing employee agrees not to enter into or start a similar profession/company in competition against the business of the employer. This Agreement is usually limited within a geographic area or for a limited time after he/she terminates the employment. If the retiree decides to work again and accepts a position that the former employer believes to be in violation with the Non-Compete Agreement, the former employer may sue the retiree in court to prevent him/her from working. The Non-Compete and Non-Disclosure Agreement is intended to protect the previous employer’s existing client base. The Non-Disclosure Agreement, too, is intended to protect the company from disclosure by the previous employee of company and trade secrets to the former’s...

Has the work world changed?

Has the work world changed since I left, will I still fit in? Perhaps prior to retiring, you entire idea of retirement is built around spending your days tending happily to your garden, or frolicking on afternoons with your grandchildren; while this sound like the best idea, there sometimes come a point when you reconsider working after your retirement. At this generation, know that you belong with many. Boomers of many different professions, industries, and occupation decide to work even after their retirement age. It could be out of financial necessity or pure interest (or sometimes, boredom!). But most of the time, it’s because they want something more than sitting around or having too much time on their hands doing nothing less productive than they were used to. The good news is that industries are very much willing to embrace back retirees While it is true that professions area always associated with being dynamic, the unparalleled experience and expertise of those who are seasoned and trained in the field continues to be a very valuable asset to every company. Perhaps the only impediment to re-engaging in your job prior to retirement would be memory loss, dementia, or other age-related illness; other than that, nothing keeps boomers from being a part yet again of the industry they had spent so much time contributing their talents to. Boomers can either re-engage in their previous careers or embark on a new one—otherwise called as “encore careers”. Most of these careers are not as stressful, difficult, or demanding; also making integration to a new industry easier. Know too that even if it had been quite a time since you last engaged in your previous occupation, it will not take long to re-integrate yourself back to the business. There are trainings and other opportunities usually offered by companies to give you the current backdrop in the industry—so no worries. At the end of the day, your lifelong dedication to your work and the business of your company is well worth enough to make you such a valuable asset in spite of your temporary respite after...

Do I need to learn new skills?

What if I don’t have the skills I need? Working after retirement can bring about wonderful opportunities to be working on your own terms. As more and more companies these days start to appreciate older workers’ experience and training in the field, they are more than willing to offer flexible and rewarding jobs. As a retiree, know that there are a lot of ways to leverage your experience and passion into finding a post-retirement career. But then again, while you have all the qualifications you need at this point, you are never too old to learn new skills and tricks. Retirement provides for an opportunity to train for a new career and land at a new exciting job. And most of these opportunities to learn do not require as much investment on your end. In fact the US Department of Labor offers several trainings under the Senior Community Service Employment Program. Through this, you can learn new skills while working at an SCSEP non-profit organization that caters to training your skills. While there is the stereotyping that older people are less able to pick up new skills at a later stage in life, this belief is really not the case at all. If any, stereotyping is an opportunity in disguise. In fact, research proves that adults have some advantage over kids for skill acquisition. This is due to the fact that adults have more life experience, and so they can attach learning to things that they already know, and they can be more strategic too. Adults are also more outcome-oriented, allowing them to identify their target performance level. This means that they decide at the onset what they should be able to do. The more specific they get the better. Learning new skills is always helpful in working after retirement. It opens up doors for opportunities as much as it gives you that sense of fulfillment at being able to be your best yet again though this time, in an entirely new field.    ...

Tax Training School

Many of the tax preparing services hire retired people. They always offer great training in tax-preparations and welcome retired people because they are experienced, trustworthy and generally easy to get along with. hrblock.ca for example offers what they call Tax School for retirees that want to become tax professionals. Students who are successful during their training are often offered retirement employment with H&R Block....

SEO Link Juice

To get Google and other search engines to notice your site and hopefully place it on the first page of search results – you need two things: Fresh, useful and current content and links from authority sites to your site. I have just set up a directory on this site and I invite you to sign up and submit your site. It is free for now, so get on board while the going is good!...

Latest Stats on working after retirement

USA Today reports today that a survey from the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies discovered that “82% of the respondents age 60 and older (Americans) either are, or expect to keep working past the age of 65. Among all workers, regardless of age, 20% expect to keep on working as long as possible in their current job or a similar one.” Only 10% of workers in their 40s said they were confident they would be able to fully retire in comfort. Wow. What retirement? Maybe the definition should just be changed. With less than 20% of “retirement” folks actually truly retire… at the conventional retirement age of 60-65 – the world is changing. I know people who are absolutely retired. They do have one thing in common, they worked many years in the same career – climbing the corporate ladder. They stuck it out when things were bad at their companies. One person I know almost quit at one point, but told me he stuck it out to keep his retirement plan active. Things picked up and he got projects more interesting and retired at 65 with a full pension from the company and undoubtedly stocks and other investment. These people I know well are typical “retired” persons in every sense of the word. They live well, travel well, and basically do what they want and enjoy it. They are also healthy, which is a great thing. They have all the toys they would ever want, and keep adding more. Living a live most people can’t even imagine. Very good for them, they deserve it, there is no doubt about that. They are now a minority amongst us 60+ year olds. As far as I can see, less and less corporations offer the same pension plans, unless you are in the top floors of the head office. That’s a different animal all together. I also know lots of people that simply cannot see retiring in this manner. No hope in hell, in spite of having worked their butts off for 30-40 years. They will get to 65 with some savings and government pensions. While prices go up.    ...

Evaluate health vs working

When you are approaching retirement and doing your calculations to see if you have to work or not – you should also evaluate your health. If you decide you should work after retirement to supplement your retirement income, take your current health into consideration. If you are healthy, and you expect to remain healthy – good. Work away. Chances are that you will have many more years of relaxed retirement even if you work for a few years after retirement. With a little extra money. However, if your health is less than perfect, and you can see slowing down sooner than later – you might re-consider working unless you absolutely have to for financial reasons. My point is that you only have so many years left after retirement. The whole idea is to enjoy those years the best you can. If you are risking your health by working, if at all possible retire on what you have to work with and prolong health issues.  ...

Setting time parameters

For us who chose self employment it is very easy to get totally caught up in our business and individual projects. I get almost obsessive sometimes. Nothing else matters. This is not good. When that happens, I find myself not enjoying non-working activities. I am learning ti set aside time for not working. Trying to anyway… not easy. It is good when we are exited about our work. That us almost mandatory. But not to the point of robbing us from the good things in life. Isn’t that why we work? I know. We all have to make a living. Pay rent. I will work harder on a balance. P.s I am writing this on my smartphone and it posts. To wordpress. ...

Your Dream Retirement Job

If you had no limitations. No worries. You could choose and it would happen. Could you define your dream job after retirement? Could it be a lighthouse keeper? A Bed & Breakfast up in the North Country? Tourist Guide? What would it take after retirement to get you totally engaged. Every morning you jump out of bed and can’t wait to make a difference! Write it down. Think about it. You might make it...

Do you really have to work?

At some point you might ask yourself when you are approaching retirement time: “Do I really HAVE to work?” You might be well off. Have enough money to do the stuff you want to do. So in that case, of course you don’t HAVE to work. In that case, you may WANT to work, or volunteer just to get out of the house. And really, the extra money you might earn might enable you to play more! If you are just breaking even with your pension budget, you have to make some decisions. Before you do that, consider these tips: Calculate the amount of money you really need. Not what you would like to have to do all the things you want, but a reasonable budget for day-to-day living after retirement. Include any government income and see where you can cut down. If you come short…. well…. then it is time to consider doing some sort of income-producing activity. Look again at your housing situation. You might see if you could release some funds by downsizing. Or simply selling, put the money into an income-producing instrument and rent. Yes, rent. Nothing wrong with renting when retired. You will save money. You are really not that interested in equity gain any more (or not much anyway). You could talk to your employer.. Sometimes you could make a deal to come on a part-time basis, or as a consultant. NOW – you think about some way to earn money while still in retirement mode. There are basically two situations: employment and self-employment. This is what this site is about....